Patris Health Ointment No. 1
14.40  incl. VAT Add to cart

Patris Health Ointment No. 1

14.40  incl. VAT

Patris Health Ointment No. 1 is a potent formula of Medicinal Herbs extractsCalendula officinalis (Marigold) and Thymus vulgaris (Thyme) with added Menthol and Camphor.

Herbs have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and wound-healing activity. They help relieve neuralgic and rheumatic aches and pains, symptoms of psoriasis, rashes, and other inflammatory skin conditions.

People commonly use Ointment No. 1 to help with swelling and leg fatigue, varicose veins, circulatory issues, rheumatic complaints, and joint and muscle pain. Moreover, it can help with light inflammation (e.g. sunburn), minor wounds and cuts, cracked skin, acne, dermatitis, eczema, and insect bites.

Free shipping on all orders over 50 €

  • Discreet delivery.
  • 24/7 customer support.
  • Quality Guarantee – replacement or refund.

Key facts about the Patris Health Ointment No. 1

The Patris Health Ointment No. 1 is a highly effective multi-purpose cream for the skin. It is easy to apply and absorbs quickly, leaving your skin feeling soft and nourished. It’s free from harsh chemicals and synthetic fragrances, making it suitable for all skin types.

  • Functional ingredients: Calendula officinalis (marigold) and Thymus Vulgaris (Thyme) with added Menthol and Camphor.
  • Target conditions: swelling and leg fatigue, varicose veins, circulatory issues, rheumatic complaints, joint and muscle pain, light inflammation (e.g. sunburn), minor wounds, cuts, and cracked skin.
  • Recommended use: Apply a sufficient amount of the ointment to the skin at the affected area and massage thoroughly. Repeat 1 to 3 times a day or as required.
  • Net volume: 84 g
  • Paraben-free, Silicon-free, Not Tested on Animals
  • Trade name: Patris Health Ointment No. 1

Medicinal properties of the Patris Health Ointment No. 1 functional ingredients

Marigold (Calendula officinalis)

Calendula officinalis (C. officinalis), also known as pot marigold, is a medicinal herb with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and wound-healing activity.1

C. officinalis has a long history of use in traditional medicine to treat inflammations, ulcers, wounds and burns.2

Marigold is beneficial as an antiseptic and an excellent natural remedy for wound treatment.3 The C. officinalis has a cleansing and detoxifying effect and can help treat chronic infections.4 Moreover, it can be used for treating problems with varicose veins and haemorrhoids.5

The Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (European Medicines Agency) assessed the Calendula officinalis in traditional use. There is an evident history of Marigold use for treating minor inflammation on the skin (e.g. sunburn), in the mouth or throat, and as an aid in healing minor wounds.

In experimental studies, certain Calendula compounds have also demonstrated antitumoral effects.6

Calendula officinalis

Some of the potential benefits of Calendula officinalis for skin include:

  • Reducing inflammation: Calendula has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects, which can help reduce redness and swelling associated with certain skin conditions.
  • Promoting wound healing: Calendula has been used to help speed up the healing process for minor wounds and skin irritations. It may also help reduce scarring.
  • Moisturizing dry skin: Calendula has been shown to have a moisturizing effect on the skin, making it a good choice for those with dry or dehydrated skin.
  • Soothing skin irritation: Calendula may help soothe and calm irritated skin, making it a good choice for use on skin conditions such as eczema or dermatitis.

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

Thymus vulgaris is beneficial for treating skin problems such as oily skin, acne, dermatitis, eczema, and insect bites.7

T. vulgaris L. has antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anti-cancerous activities.8

It is beneficial in treating wounds due to its healing and antiseptic properties.9 It helps relieve neuralgic and rheumatic aches and pains10. Moreover, it can provide relief from the symptoms of psoriasis, rashes, and other inflammatory skin conditions.

The T. vulgaris essential oil is highly antifungal when tested on various fungi and yeasts, e.g. Candida albicans. Moreover, it is a traditional herbal medicinal product used as an expectorant in cough associated with cold.11

Thymus vulgaris

Some of the potential benefits of Thymus vulgaris for skin include:

  • Antimicrobial effects: Thyme has been shown to have antimicrobial properties, which may make it effective in fighting off bacteria and other microorganisms that can cause skin infections.
  • Reducing inflammation: Like Calendula, thyme has anti-inflammatory effects and may be helpful in reducing redness and swelling associated with certain skin conditions.
  • Soothing skin irritation: Thyme may have a soothing effect on irritated skin and may be helpful in relieving symptoms of conditions such as eczema or dermatitis.
  • Reducing the appearance of blemishes: Thyme may be helpful in reducing the appearance of blemishes and improving the overall appearance of the skin.

Menthol

Menthol is the main component of the mint essential oil. It is frequently used as a natural remedy for colds and headaches. When applied to the skin, menthol has a cooling and numbing effect.

It relieves sore muscles and minor pain in the muscles. It helps with muscle aches, arthritis pain, and skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis.

The medicinal properties of menthol help to relieve pain, inflammation, and itchiness. In addition, menthol has antibacterial and antifungal properties11, making it an effective treatment for minor cuts and scrapes.

Inhaling the vapours from a menthol-infused cream or ointment can help to clear congestion and relieve sinus pressure. When applied to the chest or throat, menthol can also help to soothe coughing fits.

Mint

Camphor

Camphor exhibits several biological properties such as antimicrobial, antiviral and antitussive effects.12

Camphor has analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. It has been used for treating inflammation, infection, congestion, muscle pain, and irritation in various regions.12

C. camphora has potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity. It is an efficient remedy for skin inflammation. Camphora Essential oil has long been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases, such as rheumatism, bronchitis and muscle pains.13

Camphora also inhibits certain yeast.14 Due to its antifungal activity, camphora can be used to treat fungal infections such as athlete’s foot and ringworm.

Camphor tree

List of references:

  1. Khairnar MS, Pawar B, Marawar PP, Mani A. Evaluation of Calendula officinalis as an anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis agent. J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2013 Nov;17(6):741-7.
  2. Yoshikawa M, Murakami T, Kishi A, Kageura T, Matsuda H. Medicinal flowers. III. Marigold. (1): Hypoglycemic, gastric emptying inhibitory, and gastroprotective principles and new oleanane-type triterpene oligoglycosides, calendasaponins A, B, C, and D, from Egyptian Calendula officinalis. Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 2001;49:863–70.
  3. Oguwike FN, Onubueze DPM, Ughachukwu P. Evaluation of activities of marigold extract on wound healing of albino wister rat. IOSR J Dent Med Sci. 2013;8(5):67–70. 
  4. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Austin, TX, Boston: American Botanical Council, Integrative Medicine Communications; 2001. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs; pp. 376–8.
  5. Cetkovic GS, Djilas SM, Canadanovic-Brunet JM, Tumbas VT. Antioxidant properties of marigold extracts. Food Res Int. 2004;37:643–50.
  6. Ukiya M, Akihisa T, Yasukawa K, Tokuda H, Suzuki T, Kimura Y. Anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor-promoting, and cytotoxic activities of constituents of marigold (Calendula officinalis) flowers. J Nat Prod. 2006;69:1692–6.
  7. Prasanth Reddy V, Ravi Vital K, Varsha PV, Satyam S (2014) Review on Thymus vulgaris Traditional Uses and Pharmacological Properties. Med Aromat Plants 3: 164.
  8. Patil SM, Ramu R, Shirahatti PS, Shivamallu C, Amachawadi RG. A systematic review on ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry and pharmacological aspects of Thymus vulgaris Linn. Heliyon. 2021 May 18;7(5):e07054.
  9. Kuete V. Thymous vulgaris. In: Kuete V., editor. Medicinal Spices and Vegetables from Africa. First ed. Elsevier Inc.; 2017. pp. 599–609.
  10. Hosseinzadeh, S. , Jafarikukhdan, A. , Hosseini, A. and Armand, R. (2015) The Application of Medicinal Plants in Traditional and Modern Medicine: A Review of Thymus vulgaris. International Journal of Clinical Medicine, 6, 635-642.
  11. The Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (European Medicines Agency).
  12. Chen W, Vermaak I, Viljoen A. Camphor–a fumigant during the Black Death and a coveted fragrant wood in ancient Egypt and Babylon–a review. Molecules. 2013 May 10;18(5):5434-54.
  13. Lee SH, Kim DS, Park SH, Park H. Phytochemistry and Applications of Cinnamomum camphora Essential Oils. Molecules. 2022 Apr 22;27(9):2695.
  14. Wang J., Cao X., Song L., Ding Z., Tang F., Yue Y. Comparative chemical composition and antifungal activity of the essential oils of Cinnamomum camphora L. Presl Leaves from three geographic origins. Food Sci. 2017;38:131–136.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Patris Health Ointment No. 1”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *